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Interim Dean Inducted to Tau Beta Pi

Student members of Tau Beta Pi, the honor society for engineers, this quarter inducted Interim Dean Gregory N. Washington as an Eminent Engineer.

The Eminent Engineer honor is granted to individuals who have achieved eminence in their careers and who have exemplary character. Washington, who was named interim dean in October, is a professor of mechanical engineering. He most recently served as associate dean for research at the college. He is a member of the U.S. Air Force Advisory Board focused on Structures, Antennas and Spectrum Issues and of the National Science Foundation’s Engineering Directorate Advisory Committee, which evaluates and advises the directorate on mission, programming, initiatives, goals, administration and structure.

Undergraduate students inducted into Tau Beta Pi this year were Holly Boyer (civil engineering), Mark Fanous (integrated systems engineering), Elise Ferguson (chemical engineering), Kaitlyn Goff (aerospace engineering), Dan Havalo (environmental engineering), Jacob Huggins (chemical engineering), Louis Isabella (engineering physics), Toni Jackson (integrated systems engineering), Maggie Kociecki (civil engineering), David Lang (chem engineering), Greg Loesch (computer science and engineering), Will Murch (chemical engineering), Natalie O’Connell (computer science and engineering), Kalyaan Rao (undeclared major), Laurin Turowski (chemical engineering), Mike Vandewalle (electrical and computer engineering) and Henry White (chemical engineering).

Undergraduate students whose scholarship places them in the top eighth of their engineering class in their next-to-last year or in the top fifth of their engineering class in their last college year are eligible for membership consideration. These scholastically eligible students are further considered on the basis of personal integrity, breadth of interest both inside and outside engineering, adaptability and unselfish activity.

Tau Beta Pi is the only engineering honor society representing the entire engineering profession. It is the nation's second-oldest honor society, founded at Lehigh University in 1885 to mark in a fitting manner those who have conferred honor upon their alma mater by distinguished scholarship and exemplary character as students in engineering, or by their attainments as alumni in the field of engineering, and to foster a spirit of liberal culture in engineering colleges. There are now collegiate chapters at 234 U.S. colleges and universities, active alumnus chapters in 16 districts across the country, and a total initiated membership of 506,929.