COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Research

Honda / OSU Partnership

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The Honda Partnership Program is a bilateral collaboration between The Ohio State University and Honda of America Manufacturing that supports initiatives in education, research and public service. 

The partnership dates back to the establishment of the Honda of America manufacturing facility in East Liberty Ohio in 1988, when an endowment for transportation research was established at the Ohio State college of engineering in conjunction with Honda.  That endowment now generates $1.5 million in revenue anually to be invested in ground transportation related programs in the college of engineering. 

This collaboration positively impacts research, the development of technical professionals in the transportation field, and outreach to the broader community.  This research has been influential in reducing worker injuries in automotive assembly, and other projects have dramatically reduced the energy required for climate control in painting operations.

We are also proud of the Honda Partnership Math Medal program that provides scholarships for 40 engineering students. These programs allow exceptional students to see that exciting careers in manufacturing and transportation are right here in Ohio.

Honda/OSU Mobility Innovation Exchange (MIX)

The MIX program template is to house Honda scientists and engineers together with Ohio State faculty and students to work on cutting edge research along a wide variety of research topics. Together, Honda associates and the Ohio State community participate in brainstorming sessions, initiate research projects, and in many cases, work side-by-side in either the MIX lab (located in Ohio State's Scott Laboratory on the Engineering Campus) or at the Honda campus in Raymond, Ohio, to promote research and development activities focused on tangible outcomes that can impact Honda products while advancing Ohio State's educational mission.

Education Initiatives

Honda-OSU Scholars

David Williams congratulates Parthiv Vora David Williams, Dean of Engineering, congratulates Parthiv Vora, a senior at River Valley High School in Marion on his math medal award. With the goal of recognizing superior math scholarship, the math medal program was created to increase interest in the profession of engineering as a career choice for graduating seniors. In addition, the scholarships offer incentive for students interested in engineering careers to pursue their higher education goals at The Ohio State University's College of Engineering and their future employment goals at Honda of America.

Eighteen scholarships from the Honda-OSU Partnership will be awarded to Class of 2012 math medal recipients from the Central and Southwest regions. Currently, 64 math medal recipients receive the $3,000 scholarship and attend Ohio State's College of Engineering. Three classes of Honda scholars have graduated since the math medal award and scholarship program was initiated in 2005.

Interdisciplinary Capstone Design

Development effort for interdisciplinary courses in capstone design for senior engineering students, providing industry-relevant projects carried out in interdisciplinary teams from Electrical, Industrial Systems and Mechanical Engineering.

Enriched by industry's participation in design reviews, information on previous efforts, and contribution of domain specific knowledge, this program allows students to experience the entire process in a time effective setting, in which they are free to try out product and/or process concepts that might be deemed too risky by industry. Industry gives students these types of projects so that industry can get a fresh perspective on a design.

Objectives:

  • Increase student awareness and participation in transportation-related activities and research 
  • Develop team skills in an interdisciplinary environment
  • Work directly with engineers in the transportation industry

Examples of Capstone projects completed at Honda of America Manufacturing include:

  • A paint conveyor transfer project at a motorcycle plant, which improved production line characteristics through the automation of the motorcycle frame transfer process.
  • A bumper paint test developed to predict paint adhesion at various water pressures.
  • An Accord door weld spatter and grind project focused on reducing the number of weld spatters and adjusting the ergonomics of weld grinding.

Research

Interdisciplinary Research Infrastructure Support (IRIS)

Established in 2001, the IRIS endowment supports centralized interdisciplinary transportation-related research laboratory facilities within the College of Engineering.

Center for Health in Automotive Manufacturing Explores Ergonomic Issues

This center explores ergonomic issues in the automotive manufacturing process that impact worker safety as well as skyrocketing health care costs. Equipped with a “real world” manufacturing environment, new production technologies and cutting edge analysis methods, The center focuses on developing health risk assessment techniques for high tech manufacturing. COHAM is the only university-based full scale manufacturing operation in the world where automobile manufacturers as well as suppliers can test the effects of manufacturing systems on the health of workers.